Catch Wind of: Discover the Meaning and Usage of this Idiomatic PhraseCatch Wind of: Discover the Meaning and Usage of this Idiomatic Phrase

Phrases and idioms are an important part of any language. Learning their meaning, usage, and origin is a way of getting the full drift of a word. Catch Wind Of is a platform that allows you to do just that. With us, you can get your hands on various idiomatic expressions and learn what they mean, how to use them in a sentence, and even browse through synonyms.

As you navigate through our website, you’ll soon catch on to the natural flow of idioms and get a better understanding of how they can be used in different contexts. With our English-Chinese translation feature, you can also explore idioms in other languages. So why wait? Catch Wind Of now and sail through the sea of idioms!

Get the drift of idiomatic expressions and catch the meaning in a sentence. Learn more about their usage and the history behind them. With Catch Wind Of, you’ll soon be able to use idioms like a pro.

So, what are you waiting for? Get on board and start exploring!

Using “Get Wind of” in a Sentence

When it comes to idioms, the phrase “get wind of” is an important expression in English. It is often used to mean “to hear about” or “to discover something.” When you “get wind of” something, it means that you have heard or learned about it, usually by chance or through unofficial channels.

For example:

1. I just got wind of a new policy at work that could affect our team.

2. She quickly caught wind of the rumors and decided to investigate.

As you can see from these examples, “get wind of” is commonly used in the context of hearing news or information about something. It can also be used in the sense of “catching” or “becoming aware of.”

In sailing, the term “to get wind” is used to describe the action of a boat catching the wind in its sails and moving forward. This is where the idiomatic usage of “get wind of” gets its meaning – just as a boat catches the wind to move forward, one catches wind of something to become aware of it.

Some synonyms for “get wind of” include “hear about,” “learn of,” “discover,” and “find out about.” All of these phrases convey a similar meaning of becoming aware of something through hearing or discovering.

In conclusion, when using the phrase “get wind of” in English, it is important to remember its idiomatic usage and the different ways it can be expressed in a sentence. Whether you are an intermediate English speaker or just starting to learn the language, adding idioms like “get wind of” to your vocabulary can help you communicate more naturally and catch people’s attention.

For more idioms and their usage, you can browse through dictionaries or search for resources online. One reputable source is Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day, where you can find examples, definitions, and the origin and etymology of various idioms and expressions, including “get wind of.”

So, the next time you hear someone say they “got wind of” something, you’ll know exactly what they mean!

Catch wind of something – Search

When you catch wind of something, it means that you have heard or become aware of some information or news, usually through informal channels. This idiomatic phrase is commonly used in English and has a similar meaning to phrases like “get wind of” or “hear through the grapevine”.

If you are an intermediate English learner or someone who is just starting to learn idioms and their usage, it’s important to familiarize yourself with idiomatic expressions like “catch wind of”. Understanding the meaning and usage of idioms will help you communicate more naturally in English.

To learn more about the origin and etymology of the idiomatic phrase “catch wind of”, you can search through various English dictionaries and use their search forms. Some dictionaries also offer sentence examples and synonyms to help you better understand the usage of the phrase.

If you are looking for related idioms or want to browse through other idiomatic expressions, you can use the navigation menu on the dictionary websites. This will allow you to search for idioms related to sailing, the sea, or other idioms in English.

One such dictionary is Merriam-Webster, which provides a full search function for English idioms and their meanings. They also have an English-Chinese dictionary if you’re interested in learning idioms in both languages.

So, if you’ve caught wind of something and want to get a better understanding of its meaning and usage, make sure to search and learn more about idiomatic expressions. It’s always interesting to discover new phrases and see how people use them in sentences.

Examples of Use

Here are some examples of how to use the idiomatic phrase “catch wind of” in English:

  • Did you hear what Candace said? She caught wind of the new promotion at work!
  • Once the news spread, people all over the city could soon catch wind of the upcoming concert.
  • In the sailing world, it’s important to catch wind of a drift and adjust your course accordingly.
  • As the rumor started to drift through the office, more and more people could catch wind of the possible layoffs.
  • If you’re trying to learn new English idioms, you can search for “catch wind of” on EnglishChinese (the leading English-Chinese dictionary).
  • What does the phrase “catch wind of” mean? Use the word “catch” to mean “get” and “wind” to mean “idioms,” or expression. So, it means to get hold of or learn about something through natural forms of communication or navigation.
  • If you find this idiomatic phrase interesting, you can browse other idioms and their usage on EnglishChinese. They have a full menu of idioms to explore!
  • To catch wind of what the origin and etymology of this phrase are, you can search for it on idioms.thefreedictionary.com.
  • Here is an example sentence using “catch wind of” in a natural context: “I heard through the grapevine that they caught wind of the new policy and are not happy about it.”

Remember, idioms like “catch wind of” have different meanings and usage in English, so it’s important to learn their proper usage.

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Usage

Understanding the usage of idiomatic phrases and expressions is important for intermediate English learners. Idioms are expressions that have a figurative meaning, different from their literal one. In this section, we will explore how to use the idiomatic phrase “catch wind of” in a sentence and discover its usage.

Meaning

The phrase “catch wind of” means to hear or learn about something, often through indirect means or by chance. It implies getting information or a rumor about something that is not widely known.

Examples

Here are a few examples that demonstrate the usage of “catch wind of” in a sentence:

  • Did you catch wind of the new company policy?
  • Candace caught wind of the upcoming event through a friend.
  • People often catch wind of rumors and gossip through social media.

As you can see from these examples, the phrase “catch wind of” is commonly used when referring to hearing or learning about something indirectly or through channels other than official sources.

If you want to learn more idioms and their usage, browse our website for more examples and idiomatic phrases. Plus, you can search for specific idioms using our English-Chinese idiom dictionary. Get your hands on the full collection of idioms and catch wind of the many expressions in the English language!

Have you ever wondered about the origin and etymology of idioms? The “catch wind of” idiom has its roots in sailing, as “catch” refers to the action of a ship setting sail and “wind” represents the natural drift or direction of the sea. The phrase suggests capturing or intercepting something that is drifting by, just like a ship that catches the wind to sail onward.

Now that you know the meaning and usage of the idiomatic phrase “catch wind of,” you can start incorporating it into your own English sentences. Use it to express when you hear or learn about something indirectly or by chance. Expand your idiomatic knowledge and broaden your understanding of the English language through learning and using idioms.

Browse

When it comes to idioms, there are plenty to catch your attention. Browse through the full menu of idiomatic phrases at Catch Wind of to discover their meaning and usage. Whether you’re an intermediate English learner or a native speaker, it’s always important to get a grasp on these expressions that drift over from the sea of English.

Catch Wind of offers a wide selection of idioms from all corners of the English language. Want to learn more about the origin and etymology of a particular idiom? Just search for it in our extensive database. You can also browse through the examples and synonyms to get a better sense of how these phrases are used in different contexts.

Idioms with “wind”

One interesting set of idioms revolves around the word “wind”. From “to get wind of something” to “to drift on the wind”, these idioms all have something to do with navigation or the natural phenomenon of wind. If you’d like to learn more about how to use these idioms in a sentence, Candace Mifflin – an experienced English teacher – offers tips and explanations on Catch Wind of’s blog.

Stay tuned for more idioms and updates! The site is constantly adding new idioms and expanding its database to give you a comprehensive resource for idiomatic expressions. Plus, a new feature is coming soon! Catch Wind of’s affiliate program will allow you to earn rewards by referring others who want to catch the wind of English idioms.

Meaning of “Get Wind of Something” in English

The idiomatic phrase “get wind of something” is commonly used in English. It means to hear or learn about something, often through rumor or indirectly. When someone “gets wind of something,” they become aware of a particular piece of information or news, usually before it is widely known.

For example, if you “get wind of a new policy,” it means you have heard or discovered this new policy before it has been officially announced. Similarly, if you “get wind of a secret project,” it means you have learned about the project before it has been openly discussed.

The phrase uses the word “wind” as a metaphor for information or news. Just as the wind carries sounds and scents, “getting wind of something” means catching a hint or clue about it.

Here are a few more examples using “get wind of” in sentences:

  • “I got wind of a possible promotion at work.”
  • “She always manages to get wind of gossip before anyone else.”
  • “The news traveled fast, and soon everyone got wind of the scandal.”

The etymology of the phrase is not completely clear. While it originated in sailing and navigation, its exact roots and early forms are uncertain. However, the important thing is to understand its meaning and usage in modern English.

As with many idioms, the literal interpretation of “getting wind of something” does not accurately convey its idiomatic meaning. It is best to learn the meaning of idioms as different forms of expressions rather than searching for a direct translation.

In addition to “get wind of,” there are other idiomatic phrases related to wind in English, such as “catch the wind” or “drift on the wind.” These phrases have different meanings and usage, so it is important to learn each idiom separately.

So, if you hear someone say they “got wind of something,” they are not talking about literal wind or sailing. They are simply expressing that they have learned or heard about something before it became widely known.

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Sailing on a Sea of Idioms

Idioms are fascinating expressions that add color and depth to the English language. They are a collection of words that have a figurative meaning different from their literal interpretation. Exploring idioms is like sailing on a sea of unique expressions that catch the wind of imagination and take you on a linguistic adventure.

Learning idioms is important for intermediate English learners, as they help to improve fluency and comprehension. By understanding the meaning and usage of idioms, you can get on with native English speakers more effectively, as idioms are an integral part of their everyday conversation.

With over thousands of idioms to browse through, catching them all could be a challenge. But fear not, because our full catalog of idioms is here to help you learn their meaning and usage. Whether you want to know the origin of a specific idiom or learn how to use it naturally in a sentence, we have got you covered.

Our user-friendly navigation menu allows you to search for idioms by using keywords or browse different categories. You can also get a sneak peek of the idioms by using our sentence examples. Each idiom comes with a sentence that demonstrates its usage in a natural way.

But that’s not all! We also offer English-Chinese translations for idioms, so you can expand your knowledge of idiomatic expressions in both languages. Our affiliate program adds a fun twist to your learning journey by offering quizzes, games, and more to deepen your understanding.

So, dive in and catch wind of the sea of idioms. Soon, you’ll be sailing through conversations with idioms at hand, impressing people with your linguistic prowess. And who knows, you might even become an idiomatic expression expert like Candace Mifflin!

Idiom Meaning Usage Origin
catch wind of To hear about something I caught wind of a new restaurant opening downtown. Unknown
get on with To have a good relationship with someone She gets on well with her coworkers. Unknown
sailing on a sea To be immersed in something He is sailing on a sea of success with his new business venture. Unknown

Get Wind Of Something

When we talk about the idiom “Get Wind Of Something,” we are referring to a phrase that has a figurative meaning. Similar to the previous idiom we discussed “Catch Wind,” this expression also has its roots in sailing and the movement of the wind. However, “Get Wind Of Something” is a little different in terms of usage and meaning.

The word “Get” in this idiom means to receive or acquire something. In this case, it refers to obtaining information or discovering something. When someone “gets wind of something,” it means they have become aware of or have learned about a particular thing or situation.

For example, let’s say you were overhearing a conversation where people were talking about a new policy at work. You might say, “I just got wind of a new policy that will affect all employees.” This indicates that you recently heard about this new policy and are now aware of it.

The phrase “Get Wind Of Something” can be used in both formal and informal contexts, and it is commonly used in spoken English. It is important to note that this idiom is more commonly used in intermediate to advanced English, as it may not be as familiar to beginners. However, with exposure and practice, learners can become more comfortable using this expression.

In terms of its origin and etymology, the exact origin of this idiom is uncertain. However, the use of wind in relation to the spread of information has been around for centuries. The idea of information “drifting” or spreading naturally like the wind is a common metaphor. So, “Get Wind Of Something” carries the idea of acquiring information in a similar way.

In search of synonyms, other idioms with a similar meaning include “hear through the grapevine” or “catch wind,” which we discussed earlier. These phrases all convey the idea of learning about something through unofficial channels or indirectly.

In conclusion, “Get Wind Of Something” is an idiomatic expression with the meaning of becoming aware of or discovering something. It is commonly used in English-speaking countries, and its origin can be traced back to the metaphor of the wind spreading information. So, now that you have learned the meaning and usage of this idiomatic phrase, keep your ears open and be ready to “get wind of” new information soon!

Get wind of something – Intermediate English

What does “Get wind of something” mean?

“Get wind of something” is an idiomatic expression in English, which means to hear or learn about something, usually through informal channels or rumors. It implies obtaining information or becoming aware of something that may not be widely known.

Usage and Examples

In natural English sentences, “get wind of something” usually takes the form of:

“[Subject] + gets/was/is + wind of + [something].”

Here are a few examples:

  1. Candace learned about the new policy change when she got wind of it from her colleague.
  2. The news quickly spread after the sailing team caught wind of the storm approaching.
  3. I heard through the grapevine that there might be some changes in management, but I don’t have any details yet.

Origin and Etymology

The origin of the phrase is not entirely clear, but it likely stems from nautical terminology. Sailors would “get wind” of changes in weather conditions, allowing them to adjust their navigation accordingly. Over time, the phrase evolved to encompass the broader sense of hearing or learning about something.

Other idioms related to “get wind of something” include:

  • “Catch wind of something”
  • “Drift in the wind”
  • “Get a whiff of something”
  • “Hear on the grapevine”

Learning and using idioms like “get wind of something” is important when acquiring intermediate English proficiency. They add color and depth to your language skills and help you better understand and communicate with native English speakers.

Browse our menu to learn more intermediate English idioms and phrases. Soon, you’ll be able to navigate the English language with ease!

This content is provided by English-Chinese Dictionary, an affiliate of Houghton Mifflin. For more idioms and usage examples, search “get wind of something” on their website.

Other Forms of the Expression

The idiomatic expression “catch wind of” has several other forms that are commonly used in English. These variations of the expression have slightly different meanings, but they all convey the same general idea.

Get Wind of

The phrase “get wind of” is very similar to “catch wind of” and is often used interchangeably. It means to become aware of something or to hear a rumor. For example, if you “get wind of” a secret plan, it means that you have heard about it, usually through informal channels.

Hear Through the Grapevine

Another synonym for “catch wind of” is the phrase “hear through the grapevine.” This expression is derived from the idea of hearing news or information through unofficial channels, much like how a rumor spreads through a grapevine. It implies that the information may not be completely accurate or reliable.

Other common forms and synonyms of the expression include “learn through the grapevine,” “get wind of something,” and “hear something on the grapevine.”

For example:

– I heard through the grapevine that there are going to be some major changes in the company.

– She got wind of her friend’s surprise party and decided to help with the planning.

– John learned through the grapevine that his ex-girlfriend was moving to a different city.

These variations emphasize the natural drift of language and the different ways in which idioms can evolve over time.

If you’d like to learn more idioms and their meanings, “Catch Wind of: Discover the Meaning and Usage of this Idiomatic Phrase” is just the beginning. Search for more idioms using the navigation menu on the left or browse through other useful resources on English idioms and phrases.

This content is provided by English-Chinese Language Corner, an affiliate of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. For more information on our usage policy, please visit our website.

What Does “Get Wind of” Mean as an Idiom

As an idiom, “get wind of” is a phrase used to describe the act of hearing or finding out about something, typically something that was meant to be kept secret or unknown. It suggests the idea of information being carried through the air like the wind, spreading to different people and eventually reaching your ears.

This idiom is often used in informal conversations and in written English to express the notion of discovering or learning about something that was previously unknown or hidden. It is derived from the literal meaning of wind, which is the flow of air molecules through the atmosphere.

Origin and Usage

The origin of the phrase “get wind of” as an idiom is a bit unclear, but it is believed to have originated in the sailing community. Sailing ships heavily relied on the wind to navigate the seas. When sailors would catch wind with their sails, they would be able to move faster and more efficiently. This usage of wind as a navigation tool is believed to have influenced the idiomatic use of the phrase.

Today, “get wind of” is commonly used in both formal and informal contexts. It can be used in various forms and sentence structures, such as “catch wind of,” “hear wind of,” or “get wind of something.” Despite the many forms, the meaning remains consistent.

Meaning and Examples

The idiomatic phrase “get wind of” means to learn or become aware of something, often through rumors or indirect means. It implies hearing or discovering information that was not intended to be shared openly. Here are a few examples of how the phrase is used:

  • She got wind of their secret plan and decided to confront them.
  • He caught wind of the new company policy through his coworker.
  • I heard wind of a great new restaurant opening in town.

The phrase “get wind of” can also be used in the negative form “not get wind of,” meaning to not hear or find out about something despite others knowing about it.

Synonyms and Related Idioms

There are several synonyms and related idioms to “get wind of” that convey a similar meaning. Some synonyms include “catch on,” “learn about,” and “find out about.” Other related expressions and idioms include “get a whiff of,” “pick up on,” and “stumble upon.”

As with any idiom, it is important to understand the context and usage of “get wind of” to accurately interpret its meaning. Reading and listening to English sentences and examples that contain the phrase can help in learning and grasping its usage in different situations.

To Get Wind of – Idiom Meaning Origin

The phrase “to get wind of” is an idiomatic expression that is commonly used in English. It means to hear or learn about something, especially information that is not widely known or meant to be kept secret. When someone “gets wind of” something, it means they have become aware of it through indirect means or through rumors.

The origin of this phrase can be traced back to sailing and navigation. In sailing, being able to “catch the wind” and use it to move the ship forward is crucial. When sailors “caught wind” of a change in wind direction or speed, it allowed them to adjust their sails and navigate the seas more effectively. This idea of catching the wind and using it to one’s advantage eventually led to the figurative usage of “getting wind of” something, meaning to become aware of it and make use of the information.

In modern usage, the phrase “to get wind of” is often used in a negative context, implying that someone has discovered information that they were not meant to know. For example, if someone overhears a conversation or accidentally stumbles upon confidential documents, they might be said to “get wind of” a secret plan or policy. It can also be used in a more general sense, simply meaning to become aware of something new or interesting.

Examples:

1. Candace got wind of a new job opening through an advertisement in the newspaper.

2. I just got wind of a new restaurant that serves delicious seafood dishes.

Synonyms:

1. Hear about

2. Learn of

3. Discover

4. Find out about

Learning the meaning and origin of idiomatic phrases like “to get wind of” is an important step in mastering the English language. Understanding the etymology and usage of these expressions will give you a deeper appreciation for the natural flow and nuances of the English language.

Get Wind of Something – Origin

The idiomatic phrase “get wind of something” is often used in everyday English conversation. It means to hear or learn about something, especially information or news, in a natural or indirect way. The expression originates from sailing and navigation terminology.

In sailing, the wind is an essential factor for moving a ship or boat in a particular direction. Sailors used to rely on the wind to determine their course and make progress at sea. When the wind catches a ship’s sails, it provides the necessary propulsion to move forward. Similarly, when people “get wind of something,” they gain momentum to learn or find out about it.

The idiomatic phrase “get wind of something” is also related to the concept of drift. Just as ships drift along with the wind and currents, people can drift into hearing or learning about something without actively searching for it. It often implies that the information is spread naturally or transmitted through various channels.

For example, imagine you are at a coffee shop and overhear two people talking about an exciting event happening soon. You didn’t intentionally seek out this information, but you “get wind of” the event through their conversation.

Using the phrase “get wind of something” is an idiomatic form of English and can be used in different ways, depending on the context. It’s important to note that idioms may have different meanings or usage than their individual words.

Here are a few examples of how to use the phrase:

  1. “I got wind of a new restaurant opening in town, so I decided to try it out.”
  2. “Candace got wind of the company’s new project through an affiliate who works there.”
  3. “I’m going to browse the internet to see if I can get wind of any upcoming sales or discounts.”

The etymology of the phrase “get wind of something” can be traced back to its origin in the English language. The word “wind” refers to the natural movement of air, while “get” implies receiving or acquiring something. The phrase was first recorded in English in the 18th century and has been used ever since.

So, the next time you hear or learn about something in an indirect way, you can confidently use the idiomatic phrase “get wind of something” to express your understanding or awareness of the information.

FAQ

What does the idiom “get wind of” mean?

The idiom “get wind of” means to hear about or learn of something, especially information that was meant to be a secret or hidden.

Where does the expression “get wind of” come from?

The origin and etymology of the idiom “get wind of” are unclear, but it is believed to come from the idea of animals using their sense of smell to detect something in the air.

Can you give me some synonyms for “get wind of”?

Sure! Some synonyms for “get wind of” include “hear about,” “find out,” “learn of,” “discover,” and “pick up on.”

How can “get wind of” be used in a sentence?

Here’s an example: “I finally got wind of their plan to surprise me on my birthday.”

What is the meaning of “get wind of something” in English?

The meaning of “get wind of something” in English is to become aware of or discover something, usually through rumors or indirect sources.

What is the meaning of the idiomatic phrase “Catch Wind of”?

The idiomatic phrase “Catch Wind of” means to hear or become aware of something, especially through rumor or gossip.

Are there any synonyms for the phrase “Get Wind of”?

Yes, some synonyms for the phrase “Get Wind of” include “hear about,” “learn about,” “find out about,” and “get news of.”

Are there any other forms of the expression “Get Wind Of”?

Yes, other forms of the expression include “catch wind of something” and “get wind of something.”

What is the origin and etymology of the idiom “Get Wind of”?

The exact origin and etymology of the idiom “Get Wind of” are uncertain, but it likely comes from the idea of detecting something in the air, much like a scent or a sound carried by the wind.